Settlement Change, Urbanism, and Human and Environment Interaction at Lamanai and Ka’kabish: Two Precolumbian Maya sites in Northern Belize.

This book offers us new data about Lamanai and Ka’kabish, two Ancient Maya sites that thrived during the collapse of the Southern Lowlands in the Late to Terminal Classic periods (AD 650-1000). Introducing an interesting and innovative method (relative-risk surface) to analyse changes in Ancient Maya settlements over time. Provides a much-needed synthesis of the […]

The Archaeology of Bruce Trigger: Theoretical Empiricism

Published by McGill-Queen’s University Press in 2006, The Archaeology of Bruce Trigger is edited by Ronald F. Williamson and Michael S. Bisson and provides the reader with a chance to view how one of the world’s most influential archaeologists impacted his students, his peers and his discipline.

The Archaeology of the Parsons Site: A Fifty Year Perspective

In the late 1980s, there arose an opportunity to address the lack of published data on the Parsons site, when a proposed watermain route threatened the site. In order to mitigate the impacts that the project would cause, Archaeological Services Inc. was retained by The Metropolitan Works Department, Engineering Division to conduct excavations. This report […]

The Mantle Site: An Archaeological History of a Huron-Wendat Community

This is the first detailed analysis of a completely excavated northern Iroquoian community, a sixteenth-century ancestral Wendat village on the north shore of Lake Ontario. The site resulted from the coalescence of multiple small villages into one well-planned and well-integrated community. Birch and Williamson frame the development of this community in the context of a […]

The Parsons Site

Northwest of Finch Avenue and Keele Street in North York, on a promontory overlooking Black Creek, there is more evidence of Ontario’s fascinating archaeological heritage. Parsons (AkGv-8) is a Late Iroquoian (mid- to late fifteenth century) village site. Though the entire site has not been excavated, an indication of the site’s richness is seen from […]

Toronto: An Illustrated History of Its First 12,000 Years

From the final retreat of the Laurentide Ice Sheet to its emergence as a Canada’s leading city, this book explores the evolution of Toronto over the past 12,000 years. Five knowledgeable historians have combined efforts to bring together beautiful illustrations and fascinating, fresh perspectives in this new, natural, archaeological and social history. The book starts […]

Bones of the Ancestors

In 1997, an Iroquoian ossuary dating to the thirteenth century containing the remains of at least 87 people was accidentally discovered in Toronto. The pit was excavated and recorded. Detailed mapping of the skeletal remains led to a reconstruction of the method and sequence of placing the bodies within the ossuary. Analyses of the bones […]

Death At Snake Hill – Secrets From a War of 1812 Cemetery

Published by Dundurn Press (1993), this is a popular account of a contemporary archaeological project, the story of the skeletons it uncovered and a revealing parable of the conflicts that arise when pressures for land development collide with heritage conservation. This book is available from ASI.

Government on Fire

Government on Fire presents a lively account of the discovery and delineation of an important historical and archaeological site for Toronto and beyond. It also suggests some lessons for urban planners and heritage conservationists, who may imagine that there is little left of the more distant past within the complex and intertwined history of institutional […]